Can this be Apple’s future roadmap?

5 Oct 10-future-apple-products-FSMdotCOM1

In a world where the lines between sovereign nationhood and corporations are increasingly being blurred (roughly half of the top 50 economies in the world belong to that of corporations!), I was keen to thinking about the future of the world where Apple is concerned.

Apple have remained the foremost innovators and designers, creating that ultimate blend of functionality, art, design and user experience that has allowed for a far greater take up of technology than previously envisaged. The ease of use of Apple products has democratised the usage of technology by people, of all backgrounds, ages and capabilities.

I started considering where Apple may be heading over the next decade and half and thinking about how Apple, both as a company and as a global corporate citizen of the world, may evolve.

The image below best describes my own thoughts on where I think Apple will head towards. I have also provided a brief narrative to provide greater context.

A possible roadmap of where Apple may be headed towards

A possible roadmap of where Apple may be headed towards

Some additional context

Apple started the creation of their wider ecosystem with the development of OS X in 2000. The iPod, iPhone and iPad (along with associated products such as the iPod Touch, etc) relied on the iOS, which formed part of the greater ecosystem for Apple users.

Apple’s launch of the Apple Watch was the start of Apple’s foray into wearable technology (following at least two years of speculation).

Apple have also introduced Apple Pay, Apple HealthKit, and Apple Music (which nicely ties in with their multi billion acquisition of Beats) over the past few months.

2016 – the year of maturing of new initiatives

My view is that in 2016, Apple will support the development of additional personal and wearable technology (including iRing, Apple Glasses, etc) and we will see further launch of similar products (alongside newly launched products such as the new Apple TV). We will also see a further maturing of the Apple Pay system and greater application development for Apple HealthKit, utilising the Apple Watch and other related wearable technology.

2020 – The Apple Car zooms in

In about five years, we can expect to see the launch of the Apple Car. Possibly a completely electric car, with both driving and driverless functions, it will seek to revolutionise traffic control and movement. We can also expect to see financial aspects of the car, including insurance, leasing or hire purchase, supported by Apple Pay (or through connected bank accounts).

There could also be a potentially different model where Apple directly manage and maintain a fleet of driverless Apple cars, and passengers who seek transport can get in and by pre-booking through their Apple phones and/or other Apple products, can pay directly to Apple using Apple Pay (and taking on uber in the process).

Apple Insurance

We can also expect to see Apple providing direct insurance services to their consumers and users. Apple HealthKit can detect the health readings of an individual user and in the process price an appropriate insurance premium.

An individuals driving patterns can also provide data to help Apple price an appropriate auto/car insurance premium.

There could be a further maturing and take up of Apple Pay and related financing and banking products

2022 – Apple iBank is established

In the wake of the additional banking and insurance facilities provided directly by Apple, we can expect the iBank to be established which will allow for Apple to develop additional banking and finance capabilities, whilst also making better use of their cash hoard.

The iBank becomes the investment arm for Apple as Apple expands its product range into mortgages and fund management.

As Apple increasingly expands its portfolio of products, they start contemplating the development of Apple homes and flat

2025 – Apple the property developers and managers of societies

Apple starts producing smart iNtelligent homes to support increasing government demands for affordable, smart housing to meet the growing population demand.

The Apple Home becomes an all-encompassing home that is fitted with Apple sensors, that demands Apple usage by the users/residents and incorporates all other elements including mortgage, insurance, and electronics/appliances which syncs itself automatically with the user needs and demands.

Having a smoke at home – expect the Apple sensors to pick this up and send you an add-on to top up your health insurance with, for which you can make payment through Apple Pay – connected to your Apple iBank account.

Your fridge stacked with fizzy drinks, sugar-laden donuts and you are consistently frying food? Expect to receive a notification that your health insurance premium may be compromised and that you may need to top up!

2026 – Apple starts funding governments

As Apple Bank expands further, we can expect to see Apple Bank participating directly in funding campaigns led by the IMF, the AIIB (Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank) and the World Bank, amongst other multilateral agencies. This participation may allow for Apple to obtain additional concessions to sell their products or services.

We can also expect to see Apple participating in various UN and international conferences to support their aims and ambitions

2030 – All hail the Apple Nation

In 2030, the first Apple Citizen is naturalised. The Apple Citizen received an Apple passport, which allows him to travel to a large number of countries (all of the visa requirements are pre-met through Apple’s existing data). Apple’s virtual citizenship is supported by a comprehensive and robust Apple foreign policy backed by a deep monetary policy (exercised by Apple’s iBank) which also means the launch of the iDollar (Apple’s virtual currency backed by the Apple Central Bank).

Apple’s predictive AI (artificial intelligence) also can predict individuals who may be about to engage in subversive activities and detains them for their own benefit and reduce crime and a state of lawlessness. It also forces health lifestyle habits.

Apple starts running lives and tells people how to dream and what to dream.

The era of Apple

This could be the era of Apple. Some may welcome it as it could lead to a more efficient world. Others will resist. The resistance will be led by the men and women wearing old school Casios and using Nokias!

Greece – Defiance in the wake of economic and policy waterboarding

13 Jul A protester sports the word 'No' in Greek on his forehead as he waves a Greek flag during an anti-austerity demonstration in Syntagma Square in Athens, Greece July 3, 2015.  REUTERS/Yannis Behrakis

The events overnight in Brussels have been nothing short of what can only be considered as a brutal attack against the Greek government and its people.

Watching the images of the embattled Tspiras and Tsakalotos, the new Greek Finance Minister, struggling in meetings with Merkel and the rest of Europe’s leadership, while doing their best by the people who elected them and also gave them a clear ‘No’ vote last weekend, was painful.

However, despite the struggles, I cannot but feel a deep respect for the Greek government who are trying valiantly to hold things together in the face of such steadfast adversity.

Germany and a raft of other nations are demanding that Greece pass a whole series of legislative reforms in the next 72 hours before they extend any credit lines. Some of the bills being demanded include:

  • VAT reforms
  • Changing the pension system
  • Implement spending cuts
  • Increasing the tax base
  • Establishing greater independence for the national statistics office
  • Privatising the electrical grid.
  • Return of the ECB, IMF and the European Commission to Athens

How this is meant to all be realistically debated, agreed and passed by the Greek Parliament in 72 hours is ludicrous. In essence, a gun is being held to Athen’s head and a series of demands are being made which, if not met, will lead to an economic and social collapse in the country. In circumstances such as these, what options do the Greeks really have?

Privatising national assets worth €50B

Amidst these changes, there is also a plan by the European Commission to privatise €50B worth of Greek national assets and use it as a trust to pay off their debt! Again, this is an example of a country that’s down being crushed in an absolute and merciless manner.

This call towards privatisation is worrying. If all basic services are privatised, who is going to buy over these national services and run them? The Greek people, already suffering from a 25% contraction of their economy over the last few years, massive unemployment and falling pensions, will be dealt with possibly higher prices and debt! How is this going to realistically alleviate the conditions of the Greeks?

The word ‘Europe’ is Greek

Where is the famed European solidarity? The European experiment was meant to be a showcase of unified achievement, progress and development. It was meant to highlight how Europe, as a whole, is greater than the sum of all its parts. However, tonight’s events have hardly been a ringing endorsement.

To their credit, Hollande and Dragi have been fighting Greece’s cause and maintain a united Europe, but it is a fight they are surely losing.

The IMF is also seeking to replace the Tspiras government with one that is more likely to carry out the painful reforms which are being demanded of Greece. If this does happen, it does make a shambles of the whole notion of democracy, ironically, in the birthplace of democracy as we know it!

What hope of espousing the values of democracy, fair-play and justice to the rest of the world which will see this and realise that in the end, the might of economic power will trample over the notions of decency and support every time.

It is no coincidence that #ThisIsACoup is trending on Twitter right now.

The inequities of India’s proposed Land Acquisition Bill

3 May "Make in India" - but not for Indians' benefit?

The Indian government led by Modi has proposed a series of wide-ranging reforms to the Land Acquisition Bill which, in my personal view, will have a deleterious effect on the nation and her people.

The long and the short of this new Bill is that it will allow for the government to take over land from landowners without sufficient due diligence or understanding the social impacts in the name of ‘public interest’ whilst not actually defining what this ‘public interest’ may mean.

The proposed Land Acquisition Bill fails the most material principles of the Indian Constitution – that of democracy, welfare, justice and equality.

The context

Flawed analysis – leading to incorrect conclusions

The problems with the proposed amendments


Paddy Fields in India

Paddy field in India


The context

For almost one hundred and twenty years, India’s land acquisition was governed by the Land Acquisition Act of 1894 which was a fundamentally exploitative, oppressive and inherently unjust piece of colonial legislation. Since Independence, over 50 million people have been displaced in the name of development. A large segment of the displaced includes entire scheduled tribal communities. The vast majority of the displaced have faced declines in the quality of life, received inadequate compensation and have ended up being marginalised in their own lands.

The Land Acquisition, Rehabilitation and Resettlement (LARR) Act of 2013 was subsequently passed with the official mandate to support the twin objectives of farmer welfare along with the strategic development of the country.

When Modi and his government took over, they decided that they wanted to amend a number of major aspects of the LARR as one of their core priorities. The proposed amendments have drawn widespread condemnation and flak, not just from the opposition, but from within the ruling party itself and more importantly the majority of the populace, particularly those within the rural community.

Flawed analysis leading to incorrect conclusions

Part of the problem arises from the fact that current Indian administration’s economic analyses predicated on the notion that greater freedom by the State and large commercial interests in acquiring land and property will promote accelerated economic growth. Land acquisition is often cited as an impediment to India’s growth and India’s policymakers and a number of corporate-sponsored industry bodies would have us believe that having a draconian bill to confiscate land is the panacea to India’s economic ailments.

On the contrary, according to a Ministry of Finance-led Economic Survey of 2014/2015, it is less than 1% of projects that have stalled in India as a result of land acquisition issues.

India’s true obstacles to economic progress include corruption (which imposes a cost of between 1% to 3% of total GDP), tax evasion and ultimately a lack of a consistent and coherent economic policy.

Land grabs by the State actually have a huge cost, both economic and societal, for India. An unfair and unjust land acquisition campaign will only serve to further exacerbate the problem of rising income inequality and social disparity that remains a stain on India. The economic, social and environmental cost of displacement and conversion of forests/agricultural land towards industrial assets have never been truly understood or analysed by the government.

The ownership of land is a fundamental basis of livelihood and subsistence for a majority of Indians. Mere monetary compensation, without a resulting benefit in the form of employment will have devastating consequences for farmers, farmhands, artisans and other individuals whose livelihoods depend on agriculture and farming. Forest tribes, adivasis (large segments of tribal and aboriginal groups in India) and dalits (the most marginalised segments of the Indian population) who have been impacted as a result of past land acquisitions will in turn be even more marginalised and suffer even more inequity and exploitation.

The current Indian government is pushing for its “Make in India” slogan. There is no point making in India, if it does not benefit the majority of Indians and only serves to undermine and taint India.

“Make in India” – but not for Indians’ benefit?


The problems with the proposed amendments

There are a number of serious problems with the amendments being proposed by the government.


First and foremost is the deletion of the clause to consider the social impact assessment of the land acquisition. Without the ability to assess the possible adverse impact a potential land acquisition has on people in an area, how can we truly understand the externalities (negative or otherwise) and make an informed judgement about the wisdom of acquiring the land. How will we be able to say, to a high degree of comfort, that the benefits of the land acquisition will indeed be substantively higher than the resultant costs and consequences and benefit a broader segment of society?


Secondly, agricultural land has to be viewed as strategic assets designed to support the development of the nation in order to preserve food security. We have seen countless nations, who in their rush to convert viable agricultural land into vast sweeping industrial or tourist outposts, have lost their ability to feed and serve their people and have had to resort to food import in order to sustain themselves. It can be argued that agricultural efficiencies have improved and that the same output can be delivered with a smaller land area – but in order for this to be truly understood, there has to be a clear understanding and assessment of impacts, which this government does not want to do either. India cannot surrender her independence in her ability to feed, serve and protect her people.


Thirdly, the previous Act had a provision which required the consent of 80% of affected individuals prior to the land acquisition. The amendments proposed will allow for the government to unilaterally acquire land without the permission of the people who depend on the land. The principles of democratic conventions are being violated here. Unlike a few other countries, India’s rule of law is not enforced by a dictatorship of some nature or under a command economy where all ownership belongs to the State. India is a democracy – a government of the people, by the people, for the people. With the proposed amendment, the state will be a government of a very small group of people, by the faceless/nameless corporates and industries, and certainly not for the people.


Fourthly, the amendments themselves are vague and, it appears, intentionally ambiguous. ‘Public purpose’ has not been clearly defined and no indicators are being proposed to indicate whether the nation benefits and aids the welfare of all. Five categories of projects are being proposed (national security and defence; rural infrastructure; affordable housing; industrial corridors; and infrastructure (including public-private partnership projects (PPPs)) which are being defined in the broadest possible way which will allow for the government and their industry and corporate partners to acquire/confiscate land without a robust case. It is the absence of a sufficiently strong check and balance that is the biggest cause for concern here.

As the law stands, if no development takes place on acquired land within five years, it has to be returned to the people. This has also now been amended and the land can be held on indefinitely from the time of purchase with no recourse made available to the people who are being impacted. Under the amendments, more land than is required can also be acquired by the government, including the purchase of an additional one kilometre of land on both sides of an industrial corridor – which again will have severe debilitating effects on farmers and small land owners. There is also no consideration of efficiency on the part of the industries and the state looking to acquire the land for their uses and it does not spur or promote more efficient use of the land and instead ends up subsidising the absence of efficiency improvements made by industries.


Finally and most fundamentally, the proposed amendments to the Land Acquisition Bill violate the principles of individual liberty and human rights. What this Bill does is redistribute land away from the poor and the most vulnerable to the richest and most privileged segments of society. The principles of prior consent and recognition of the societal and economic impacts on the people most directly impacted by any land acquisition is essentially a land grab by those who can from those who cannot do anything about it.

Land Grab


Land is not just a mere economic commodity or factor of production to a large number of people who will be affected by the proposed amendments of the Land Acquisition Bill. Land is a source of life, of sustenance, of faith and of hope. It is a function of the culture of the people who depend on it, be it the farmers, the forest tribes or the dalits. It is a source of livelihood, of dignity through employment and of a symbol of progress and growth.

India can only truly progress, economically and socially, if there is an improvement in the lives of all Indians and not just a select and privileged few.

A nation must be judged not just on what economic progress it has made but on how it has enhanced the welfare of its most vulnerable constituents.

The proposed amendments violate the principles of the Indian Constitution which dictate that India remains a sovereign, socialist, secular and a democratic republic. Socialism and democracy will be the first casualties if this Bill comes to pass – for how can a nation claim to be democratic when it tramples over the rights of its own people to own land without a proper recourse and safeguards.

The amendments to the Land Acquisition Bill must be opposed at all costs. At stake here is not just about India’s principles of fairness and equity for her people but about the future of a prosperous India which benefits all and not just a select few.


References: (Shivani Chaudhry)

Supporting social mobility – a lesson from Croatia

12 Apr

Our friends in Croatia undertook an interesting experiment, codenamed, “Fresh Start,” a couple of months ago in February 2015. They decided to write off the debt of 60,000 of Croatia’s poorest citizens. This debt write-off was a one-time move by a leftist government (incidentally a government that faces a key election and one can therefore take a cynical view that this is merely an election ploy but I’ve chosen to focus on the wider social/economic benefits this initiative can provide).

“Fresh Start” was essentially a programme that was designed to help the poorest and most vulnerable citizens cope with an economic crisis for which they had little or no responsibility.

The initiative in brief:

Croats whose debts do not exceed 35,000 Croat Kuna (or 4,800 Euros) and whose bank accounts have been frozen for over a year can apply under the scheme to have their total debts written off.

Under the plan, only those with a monthly income in the last three months that did not exceed 2,500 kuna (340 Euros) are eligible.

Continue reading

Finland’s progressive philosophy to education

4 Apr

Having just visited Helsinki, a city I would strongly recommend visiting, I learnt a fair bit about Finland’s overall philosophy to education, learning and development. This came through discussions I had with a number of people whom I met whilst travelling there.

Learning to skate in Helsinki city centre


Finland provides a great blueprint for establishing a world-class education system that instills a philosophy of holistic development, lifelong learning and an ethos geared towards the progress of not just self, but of society as a whole.

The Finnish education standards are also amongst the highest in the world, under most global indicators, from the Education Index produced by the UN Human Development Index, to the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), to surveys conducted by the World Economic Forum (WEF).

I think it will be useful to start this short discourse on Finland’s education system with this quote:

“Finnish early childhood education emphasizes respect for each child’s individuality and the chance for each child to develop as a unique person. Finnish early educators also guide children in the development of social and interactive skills, encourage them to pay attention to other people’s needs and interests, to care about others, and to have a positive attitude toward other people, other cultures, and different environments. The purpose of gradually providing opportunities for increased independence is to enable all children to take care of themselves as “becoming adults, to be capable of making responsible decisions, to participate productively in society as an active citizen, and to take care of other people who will need his [or her] help.” – Anneli Nikko.

This pretty much encapsulates the overall philosophy the Finns have adopted towards education and learning.

It is worth noting the following points about education in Finland:

  • All education is free (including fully subsidised hot meals for all students).
  • Parents of new born babies are given books to read to the children – to inculcate a habit of reading!
  • There are no university tuition fees and benefits are provided for university students.
  • All children have to learn 2 foreign languages in addition to Finnish.
  • The values of living in harmony with one another and respect for all cultures, traditions and faiths are taught very early on in a child’s life.

A happy, multicultural childhood

The advent of ‘phenomenon’ teaching

Finland’s leading educators, despite their formidable achievements, have not sat on their laurels. They have continued to identify the changing trends taking place within the wider global economy and labour trends and are adapting to meet the rising challenges.

Across most parts of the world, there is a pressing issue of youth unemployment, which ranges from 25 to 50%, across Spain, Greece, Saudi Arabia and major economies. This is partly due to ‘skills mismatch’ that occurs as a result of employers not getting the skills they need from individuals who leave the schools’ systems.

What Finland is undertaking now is a radical reform that is scrapping, in a phased manner, the traditional teaching by subjects (such as learning maths, English, history, etc discretely) and instead focussing on teaching by topic areas.

For instance, students may learn about ‘business planning’ which will be a combination of languages, Maths, communication skills and writing skills. Some students may learn about the European Union, which will be a combination of history, economics, languages and geography. This inter-disciplinary approach will also help students make the links between the subjects they learn and how it can be applied in the real world rather than learn them as mere abstract subjects without necessarily viewing why they are important.

As part of the reforms, students are also working in smaller groups from an earlier stage to improve communication skills, embed a spirit of collaboration and solving problems and thinking of new ideas.

Interestingly enough, pupils, under this new education framework, will also be more involved in the planning and assessment of these phenomenon-based lessons, encouraging pupils to take ownership of their education and development.

Marjo Kyllonen sums it up best: “We really need a rethinking of education and a redesigning of our system, so it prepares our children for the future with the skills that are needed for today and tomorrow”

Best education in the world

There is a significant amount for the rest of the world, and particularly Asia, to learn from the Finnish education system. The education systems across most parts of Asia do produce technically competent and highly skilled individuals, but are more geared towards exams and merely scholastic achievement when learning should be more holistic.

As I said at the start, Finland – a great country and a great place to live and learn!

What the Asian Infrastructure Development Bank means for Asia and the world

12 Oct The Asian Investment Infrastructure Bank

Almost exactly a year ago, just prior to the Asia Pacific Economic Co-operation (APEC) hosted in Bali in October 2013, President Xi Jinping announced the proposal for the establishment of the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB). This was a major announcement which was unforeseen and unexpected particularly as no clear plans were outlined at the time.

Since the announcement however, Chinese officials have been very busy in encouraging other fellow Asian partners to be the initial founding partners of the AIIB.

To date, the Chinese Ministry of Finance has convinced over 22 Asian partners including the likes of Singapore and Bangladesh to confirm their participation as founding partners and contribute to the initial funding capital.

Other major partners such India, Qatar and Saudi Arabia have been very bullish about the prospects and the promise of the AIIB and have made very positive overtures publicly about their participation as founding members. Other South East Asia partners such as Thailand and Malaysia remain positive and other major partners such as South Korea and Australia are still studying the Chinese proposals.


The Asian Investment Infrastructure Bank

The role and rationale for the AIIB

The mandate of the AIIB, as a multilateral development institution, is to support the financing of infrastructure developments across Asia that supports economic growth and activity nationally and regionally.

Traditionally Asian nations have turned to the Asian Development Bank (ADB), the International Monetary Fund (IMF)  and the World Bank for financial support. However, the level of financial assistance, particularly from the World Bank and the IMF have dropped since the 2008 financial crisis.

The ADB is also being increasingly viewed as a bureaucratic entity which takes almost seven years to launch a project or initiative (from proposal to the approval of funding) which leads to significant delays due to red-tape.

These conditions do not support the urgent need for infrastructure investment by a number of Asian economies. The ADB estimates that Asia needs about US$8 trillion of physical infrastructure investment between 2012 and 2020. The OECD estimates that globally over US$50 trillion of infrastructure investment is required over the next two decades to support sustained economic activity.

The AIIB is expected to have an initial capital of between US$50 billion to US$100 billion with China contributing to half that amount. This will immediately create an entity that is stronger than the Asian Development Bank (which has a current capitalisation of about US$78 billion) and will be around half of the World Bank’s current capitalisation of between US$180 billion to US$200 billion.


Implications and impact for major Asian partners

The creation of the AIIB has a number of major implications for Asian economies. Growth prospects With depressed growth prospects – strong investment in infrastructure projects will support the creation of demand and improve production and consumption. The enhanced infrastructure will also support greater trade and economic expansion.

This is certainly the case for India which forecasted a need for approximately US$1 trillion to meet infrastructure requirements under its 12th five-year plan (from 2012 to 2017) but is struggling to meet the investment target. Participation in the AIIB will allow for India to raise greater capital and visibility for some of her public-private infrastructure initiatives. The rest of the South Asian subcontinent, including Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Nepal and Pakistan have all either signed up with the AIIB or shown strong interest in the initiative. If India chooses to remain on the side lines, her influence across South Asia will further diminish. The AIIB will be a strong platform for India to take on a regional leadership role and be seen to be a partner for the region’s growth and success.

The AIIB will also certainly support a number of smaller Asian economies which have been unable to meet the stringent requirements or payment terms set out by the likes of the Asian Development Bank or the World Bank. This includes the likes of Nepal, Cambodia and Laos.

From a political perspective, the impact for Japan as a result of these developments is significant. The Asian Development Bank has traditionally been led by Japan (who along with the US share the majority voting rights in the ADB) which previously allowed Japan to exert her political and economic influence across Asia. The AIIB will certainly curtail Japan’s political influence across Asia and also strengthen China’s hand in the on-going disputes ranging from the South China Sea territorial issues to legacy World War II disputes.

South Korea on the other hand is trying to navigate its participation in the AIIB tenderly. On one side, Seoul has to please her largest trading partner, China, whom she is working closely with towards greater economic success. On the other side, Seoul’s traditional security partner, the US, remains a critical partner in South Korea’s regional defence strategy.

ASEAN (Association of Southeast Asian Nations) has certainly shown significant support for the AIIB. Indeed Singapore was one of the early founding members of the AIIB as they have a clear stated policy of working with China from the inside rather than remaining out on the side lines looking in. Other major ASEAN economies such as Thailand, Malaysia and Indonesia are likely to sign up to the AIIB to exert greater influence in the way the bank is run and managed which will in turn support their own investment and growth plans. However, there will be concerns, particularly from Philippines and Vietnam, which in recent times have had strong and sharp exchanges with China over the South China Sea islands. Their concern will be that should China take a greater role in economic influencing and funding, it will strengthen China’s hand and erode Vietnam and Philippines’ support in their respective claims in the South China Sea.

Asia has always traditionally had strong savings, currently estimated to be worth over US$3.99 trillion. This supply of savings can meet some of the immediate infrastructure requirements across Asia but there is a mismatch in channelling these savings towards the financing of the infrastructure projects. The AIIB can help resolve this funding gap moving forward.


Problems with Uncle Sam?

The US government has not hidden their opposition to the establishment of the AIIB.

Their biggest concerns are around how China will use the AIIB to further project her economic and political dominance across the region. It also gives greater clout to other major Asian partners such as South Korea and India whilst diminishing the influence of the United States’ traditional Asian partner, Japan (who leads the ADB as highlighted above). This does alter the geopolitical realities in the region and softens the US hegemony in the region.

Some of the other concerns highlighted by the US government is that the new bank will not have adequate and robust safeguards in areas such as environmental protection, human rights and a transparent procurement process which will undermine the need for good governance across the region. Indeed, if the AIIB fails to have strong safeguards, it will exacerbate the challenges of corruption, lack of accountability and proper due diligence which have remained endemic problems across Asia (and also around the world). However, it is likely that the AIIB will operate to very high and rigorous global standards when assessing and evaluating projects.

However, it must be noted that China has made it clear from the outset, and also recently at the Boao Forum for Asia, that they welcome the participation of the US and other European Union partners in the AIIB. This will provide an opportunity for non-Asian partners to support the bank and ensure that AIIB’s governance and strategy is in line with global standards.

The US should use this as an opportunity to partake in the region’s continued growth and stability. US participation in the AIIB (which will be subject to lengthy Congressional debates) will certainly do more to support US foreign policy of a safer and prosperous world rather than the current position of dissuading potential partners from participating in the AIIB.


The future

The AIIB will need to create strong and close collaborative partnerships with the likes of the World Bank and the ADB so that they are not working to cross purposes. Encouragingly, the World Bank have announced their wish to work closely with the AIIB when they launched the Global Infrastructure Fund (GIF) earlier in October 2014. Similarly, the ADB have also announced their intentions to work closely with the AIIB.

The AIIB will also need to create a viable and sustainable business model which channels funding appropriately towards infrastructure investment.

Recently, the BRICS Bank or the New Development Bank was set up by Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa. The BRICS Bank is headquartered in Shanghai and the Presidency is maintained by India for the initial five years. However, the funding from this BRICS bank is only available to the BRICS nations and not to the rest of Asia. The AIIB helps to alleviate this issue.

The AIIB can potentially create a platform that generates economic ties and greater unity across Asia. It provides a strong and credible opportunity for major Asian rivals to become partners towards growth and development. Initiatives such as these will help to provide resolution to tricky issues that always emerge between partners and friends.


Revitalising Scottish Football – a 10-point proposal

4 Oct A 10-point plan to revitalise Scottish football!

As a big fan of Scottish football for a while (I’ve been following Celtic since I was at university!), it has been sad to watch the decline of the game in Scotland over the last couple of decades.

I have been giving further thought as to what could be done to revitalise the game in Scotland and to inject vigour and excitement back into one of the old leagues in the world. Lest we forget, it was a Scottish team (Celtic) that was the first amongst British teams to win the European Cup; the largest attendance for a European game was at the 1970 European Cup Semi-Final at Hampden Park where over 130,000 fans watched the game; and one of the largest attendance for an international fixture was between Scotland and England when almost 150,000 fans watched the game! Scottish football has also provided other moments of magic. Indeed the jinking run made by Archie Gemmill as he scored against Holland in the 1978 World Cup remains one of the best goals ever seen in an international game.

I have a number of suggestions and initiatives which may support raising the global profile of Scottish football and in the process rejuvenate the league and raise the game.

1. Leverage off the tradition and history of Scottish football teams

The story of Celtic – a club established in 1888 by Brother Walfrid with a clear purpose of raising money for charity and alleviating the crippling poverty witnessed in the East End of Glasgow – is one that will resonate significantly across many societies and cultures in many parts of the world. Certainly the Confucian principles under which Celtic was set up will be a big draw in East Asia, if only more people knew more about it.

On the other hand, we have Rangers, another illustrious Glaswegian club with a rich sense of history. Together, Celtic and Rangers, or the Old Firm as they collectively know, form one of the world’s most enduring and exciting rivalries in football. The differences in social ideology, a rivalry that has lasted over a century and the collective successes of both clubs are huge sources of excitement for anyone anywhere in the world, regardless of background or creed.

It will be important for Scottish football teams to draw out their rich and vibrant histories and backgrounds and promote and sell a compelling story to the world! Where Scotland is concerned, there has always been a sense of romance, and perhaps it is this which Scottish football clubs should appeal to.

2. Host an Old Firm derby (or friendly) outside of the UK – possibly in China, Japan, India, Indonesia or in North America

The Old Firm derbies have always evoked a lot of passion and there is a certainly a rich sense of history to the games between Celtic and Rangers. One suggestion is for these derbies to be played outside of the UK in places like China, Japan (where Scottish football is already popular thanks to Japanese superstars like Nakamura), India or Indonesia or perhaps somewhere in North America where there is a strong Scottish diaspora present.

It will be important to invest in the marketing and promotion of the history of the Old Firm, the rivalry and the passion, so that people buy into the history which I’ve alluded to in point #1 above. Global football fans love a sense of history and if they can be educated on the excitement which is the Old Firm derby, it will be extremely popular and it will create an interest in the Scottish game which will result in positive externalities for the whole of Scottish football.

It is important for Scottish football to project and market itself beyond her current shores and capitalising on stories such as that of the Old Firm derbies will be an important part of that process.

3. Greater focus on youth and grassroots development (and innovative approaches around youth development)

Focus must also be paid to effective talent management and retention of youth footballers. The Scottish Football Association certainly has taken a lead in ensuring that the game reaches out at a grassroots level and youngsters across schools are being developed and talent spotted. Certainly this has to continue to ensure that the national team has a steady pipeline of talented football coming through the ranks. There should be further adoption of best practices from other successful youth academies such as the Dutch youth development schemes as well as from clubs such as Barcelona which has a world class development programme under the La Masia academy which has produced world class talent over the years. There has to be a focus on technical development towards individual improvement as well as a focus on unified team excellence.

Highly promising youngsters should also be sent on loan to other youth development programmes at other clubs and even continents to gain further exposure. They must be fully supported to ensure they develop with both footballing and academic skillsets which will support them throughout their lives.

4. Scottish U-21 national team or Celtic, Aberdeen, Rangers U-21 or ‘B’ teams to participate in emerging Asian leagues

Increasingly, we also see youth national teams participate in other leagues. For instance, the Singapore U-23 team participates in the Malaysian League and likewise the Malaysian youth team participates in the Singaporean Premier League. This has led to increased exposure for the younger players and has also helped to lay the foundations for the senior national teams.

One suggestion is for the Scottish U-21 national team or perhaps the U-21 or U-23 teams at the leading Scottish teams to participate in emerging Asian leagues in Asia (potentially Southeast Asia or South Korea, China or Japan). This will give greater exposure for the Scottish youth players whilst also providing them with the opportunity to pit their skills against senior and more experienced professionals. This will raise the quality of the game which will ultimately benefit the Scottish national team. It also will help to act as a strong brand agent for Scottish football and clubs in the countries they are playing in which will in turn drive greater interest for the Scottish game. Raising the visibility of Scottish football will be significantly easier through an initiative such as this.

5. Scottish football teams to engage international student societies in leading Scottish universities

I became a fan of Scottish football and Celtic when I was at university and it has remained an enduring and lasting relationship. I have remained a Celtic fan and have attended games where possible and also spent (considerable!) amounts on kits and souvenirs. I have also been a passionate advocate of Scottish football to friends around the world.

I do believe that if Scottish football clubs appeal to particularly the international student societies at the leading Scottish Universities such as Glasgow University, Uni of Strathclyde, Uni of Edinburgh, etc and provide heavily discounted or free tickets to students at universities, it will create a greater interest and participation by the international students of Scottish universities. These students will also return home to spread the word of the excitement of Scottish football and will become active ambassadors who will promote Scottish clubs and football and this will increase the visibility of the league and teams in Scotland.

Building an interest in the game at a local grassroot level is important and building it at an international level will require active global ambassadors and what better ambassadors than a young person from beyond Scottish shores whose imagination and passion has been captured.

6. Capitalise on Scotland’s greater international profile (off a very successful Commonwealth Games and the increased publicity as a result of the Independence Referendum)

Over the last year, Scotland has gained even more extensive international prominence in the eyes of the world. A hugely successful Commonwealth Games has helped to project Glasgow and Scotland in a very positive manner to viewers from around the world. Likewise, the very exciting Independence Referendum (please see a separate article here around the positive impact the referendum has had here) has also catapulted Scotland into the centre of world affairs. Scottish football should leverage from the positive goodwill accrued and use it to project her achievements and the history and gain further traction in the international arena.

7. Negotiate separate deals with Asian TV broadcasters 

Scottish football should also consider negotiating separate deals with national broadcasting companies in Asia, going beyond the current SKY/BT Sport models. One possible way of doing this is rather than selling entire football packages, the Scottish Professional Football League (SPFL) should consider a weekly 1-hour highlights programme which they edit (where the best of the week’s footballing content is captured) and sold to national TV companies across Asia and Europe which will create further excitement about Scottish football and also creates an additional revenue stream which benefits all the teams in the Scottish leagues.

If some of the other points here are implemented and there is a greater interest in Scottish football, it will allow for the SPFL to have a stronger hand in negotiating contracts and TV deals.

8. Twinning programme with other European clubs

Scottish football teams should consider formal twinning arrangements with clubs across Europe. For instance, Celtic could consider twinning with Barcelona, Abderdeen with Roma, Rangers with Juventus (given similar histories in their rise from lower leagues following demotion), etc.

The twinning arrangements could consider exchange of youth players, sharing of marketing, development of junior teams, charity matches and the sharing of best practices. This will allow for Scottish football clubs to implement and adopt global best practices in team and club management. The twinning arrangement could also extend to fans (where fans attend games of their twin clubs) and create greater camaraderie and friendship across borders.

This will lead to a greater level of dialogue and cross-cultural interactions which benefit not just the football teams but also the people behind the various teams. The exchange of youth players also aids in the player development which ultimately benefits both the Scottish clubs as well as the national team. It also improves the scouting network of Scottish teams which will again improve the quality and standard of players within the Scottish leagues.

9. Recommendation for an annual British Cup (featuring the top teams from the Home nations)

This idea may have been mooted before but it may be worth revisiting. There could be an end of season tournament each year where the top two teams from England, Wales, Northern Ireland and Scotland along with the respective FA Cup finalists taking part in a knockout tournament. Potentially this could see Manchester City, Liverpool, Celtic, Motherwell, Cliftonville, Linfield, The New Saints and Broughton all taking part in a knockout tournament (with each team playing each other only once at a stadium decided by a draw), leading to a semi-finals and then a final where the British Champions are crowned. This has significant potential for a global audience and will spur interest and support from not only the respective countries taking part, but also raise publicity for the lesser known clubs and unearth heroes who were hitherto unknown!

10. International and localised branding and marketing

Finally, in addition to some of the points highlighted above, once Scottish football and clubs have decided on target markets they are keen to extend their reach in, they should consider local language websites, collateral and more active publicity and branding campaigns in these countries. They should also consider adapting to different pricing structures for the sales of kit and collateral items to reach out to a larger target audience. They could do this through the kit partners (such as Nike, Reebok, etc) initially and then subsequently also consider setting up their own shops. These will have the effect of driving further revenue streams and also more importantly drive greater awareness and build brand recognition in the countries they are in.


The above suggestions could potentially go someway towards addressing some of the more pressing needs of Scottish football today. The suggestions individually may not have the desired impact, but collectively could reinforce Scottish football further and create the impetus required to grow and develop further.

I do fundamentally believe that Scottish football can punch beyond its weight and be a real force in European and world football. Ambition reinforced with vision and urgency will allow Scottish football to achieve its aims and collective goals.


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