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A Sino-Scottish Football Proposal

Readers of this blog will know of my interests (and soft spot) for all things Scotland. I previously wrote a brief ten-point approach to revitalising Scottish Football.

In the time that has elapsed since that article was written, we’ve seen a robust approach to football development in China. Now, football has always been popular in China but the attempts towards establishing China as a footballing powerhouse have been sporadic at best. However when President Xi Jinping became the President of the People’s Republic of China, it all changed.

president-xiIt has to be noted that President Xi is a huge football fan and he has publicly outlined his vision for China to one day host the World Cup and to then win it! In 2015, a 50-point plan was announced by the Central Planning Committee (of the Chinese Communist Party) to overhaul Chinese football and it was overseen by President Xi.

This desire for China to be a football giant isn’t a new one. The other Chinese leader in the past who had huge dreams for Chinese football was Deng Xiaoping, the architect for China’s economic liberalisation but his priorities had to be primarily on economic and social development.

Chinese football fans are a hugely passionate lot – I recall watching the Singapore Armed Forces FC (SAFFC) playing the Chinese Army Ba Yi team in 1998 at the old Kallang Stadium in Singapore and it was sellout turnout that was half Singaporean and half Chinese (despite the fact it was held in Singapore!) and the passion and energy was fantastic.

In fact, when Stockport County (from the Second Division) did a tour in China, their matches were attended by over 20,000 fans per game (more than five times their home average home attendance!).

The Chinese Football Association Strategy

The Chinese Football Association have clearly spelt out their desire and strategy to be a ‘world football superpower by the middle of the century.’

In an effort to match the strategy, they have embarked on a five-pronged approach towards delivering their vision.

1. Grassroots training, academies’ development and training

The Chinese investment into building the game at grassroots level is absolutely staggering. According to a memo sent out by the Ministry of Education in China on July 2015, they have identified 4,755 schools as specialist footballing academies.

Last year, the world’s largest (and arguably the most expensive) football academy – the Evergrande Football School – opened in Guangzhou, a Southern Chinese province. The school built in 10 months cost over $185 million. The school also has partnered with Real Madrid to provide the trainers and coaches to help develop about 3,000 young Chinese footballers.

Other football clubs, including Manchester City, and ex-players such as Luis Figo and Michael Owen have also established their football academies across China.

The Chinese government have also expressed a clear commitment to include football as part of the overall school curriculum.

This is part of the overall goal to ensure over 50 million children and adults play football regularly by 2020 and to develop the critical mass of high-quality players required to develop a world-class team.

2. Providing Chinese players with international experience and exposure

There have not been as many high-profile Chinese players in European leagues. The two most recognisable players were Sun Jihai and Li Tie who played for Manchester City and Everton respectively. Unlike South Korean and Japanese superstars (such as Park Ji Sung for Manchester United, Hideotoshi Nakata, Shunsuke Nakamura for Celtic, et et), Chinese players have not been able to shine at the top European leagues.

There is now concerted effort to get Chinese players playing in the top European leagues to get the international exposure. There is a reasonable expectation that this will not only allow for top players to develop their craft further but also help China in their international competitions.

It is to be noted though that Chinese players turning out for British teams saw over 350 million Chinese viewers becoming more interested in British football!

3. Ownership and partnerships with globally-renowned football clubs

The top Chinese companies are now investing, partnering or buying outright top teams across Europe. From Atletico Madrid to Inter Milan to Wolverhampton Wanderers, we see Chinese ownership. Chinese consortiums are also partners in other clubs such as Manchester City. This is part of a wider effort not only to drive economic benefits that come from effective management of football teams but to also learn and adopt best club management practices. These best practices will ultimately support better footballing management and establishment of world-class processes and procedures required to develop a football network back in China.

4. Bringing world-class managers and trainers to China

The top teams in the Chinese leagues are now bringing in expert football managers and coaches with very impressive pedigrees. The likes of Luis Felipe Scolari, Sven-Goran Erikkson and Dan Petrescu have come to Chinese leagues and have helped raise the level of the game in China.

5. Signing high-quality talent and superstars from overseas to play in Chinese leagues 

In the recent year we’ve seen the financial muscle of Chinese football clubs (supported by the richest Chinese companies and their billionaire owners, including Jack Ma of Alibaba fame and Wang Jianlin, owner of Dalian Wanda and China’s richest man) outbid top European clubs for the services of world-class footballers. From Ramires (£23 million), to Alex Teixera, to Hulk (for £47 million), to Carlos Tevez (being paid an estimated £20m per annum), we’re seeing a very deliberate policy of bringing the best players to China in an effort to drive up the overall quality of Chinese players in the Chinese League through better exposure to top talent.

What all of the above demonstrates is a clear laser-like focus on the Chinese government ambitions of winning the World Cup in the coming decades. We see the ambition being matched with money, political support and commitment from across all sectors (education, business and policy) – and this is just the start. 

One Area For Further Development

There is, however, one area which is still missing. Chinese players need to be playing against quality opposition week-in, week-out. Whilst the youth and grassroots development is a step in the right direction, it is going to take a decade or more before there is a crop of players who will provide the quality opposition. Having a few superstar players (limited to three foreign players per team in any event) again is not enough. Similarly, having a couple of world-class coaches is not going to be enough.

The Chinese league needs to have complete teams with quality players who can provide the Chinese players with the type of competition and exposure that will allow them to make step changes in their development and progress.

This is where Scottish football comes in!

What Could This Mean For Scottish Football?

The Scottish FA have provided for development loans to help build the youth football framework across Scottish football clubs. The Scottish FA have also provided financial incentives to Scottish football team for performance-based outcomes which include number of under-21 players in the first team.

Alistair Gray, in a BBC interview, also highlighted the quality of youth players from Scotland and the need for the players to have more competitive game time to further develop their capabilities.

The Proposal

My proposal is that the Chinese Football Association allow for the Celtic U23 and Rangers U23 participate in the Chinese Super League and increase the size of the league from 16 to 18 teams.

What would this mean for Chinese football and the players in the league?

  • It means that you will have the top Chinese teams playing against the cream of the crop from Scottish Football , against young players who are technically very competent.
  • It will also allow for Chinese teams to get used to the pace of football Scottish teams can provide and help build the overall footballing game intelligence for Chinese league players.
  • This will allow for a much more holistic development of Chinese players and get them acclimatised to playing against different styles and against much higher overall quality players.
  • It could also lead to a more formal exchange programme between Chinese league players and Scottish football clubs and also promote greater youth development through these exchange programmes.

There are significant benefits for Scottish football as a result of this proposal:

  • It will mean the top youth players from Scotland will have the opportunity to play against an up-and-coming group of Chinese players and further hone their skills.
  • It will also create greater interest in Scottish football by Chinese fans and will spur a greater following. It will help expose Chinese football fans to the intrigues and entertainment of Scottish football. The history of Scottish football, its lore and fables – from the Lions of Lisbon, to the history of the Old Firm derbies,   Archie Gemmill’s wonder goal against the Dutch in the 1978 World Cup. This will allow for the Scottish Professional Football League to negotiate better rates for the TV deal in China in the future. Imagine a world with a billion more interested Scottish football fans!
  • An Old Firm derby in Shanghai – the opportunity to recreate one of the world’s most historic football rivalries, creating an interest in the history and ethos of both Celtic and Rangers for an entirely new audience remains a very tantalising prospect.
  • It also provides a fabulous opportunity for Scottish youth to experience a year out in China, learning more about the culture and experiencing life from a different lens and perspective. This can only further build the bridges between cultures.

Ultimately this initiative will lead to greater awareness and relationships between both China and Scotland. It also becomes a fantastic opportunity for Scotland to showcase her natural beauty, the culture and traditions of Scotland and help increase the overall tourism and investment by Chinese.

It will also help the Chinese sports authorities get one step closer to meeting the Chinese leadership’s ambitions of one day winning the World Cup. Now, that’s an offer that will be hard to refuse.

 

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The Lions of Lisboa

An interesting story to share in these tumultuous times. Today, Celtic FC surpassed a 50-year old record for unbeaten games. The previous team that held the record were the Celtic team of 1967, who were also known as the ‘Lisbon Lions ‘for being the first British team to win the European Cup by defeating the expensively assembled Inter Milan in 1967 in Lisbon.

I managed to catch the play, ‘The Lions of Lisbon ‘ today at the Tron Theatre as part of Celtic Connections 2017. It is a heartwarming play for anyone interesting in catching it!

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It is also worth reminding ourselves of the origin of Celtic Football Club in 1888. It was founded by Brother Walfrid who established the club so as to support and feed the starving, to help those who were being persecuted for their religious beliefs, the refugees, and alleviate poverty through the raising of funds by hosting football games.

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This has led to the Celtic Football Club ethos of being open to anyone, regardless of their religious beliefs, their creed, race, colour or creed.

A message which is needed today more than ever. Hail Hail!

#Celtic #Lisboa50

The Lions of Lisbon

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Robots! Clear and Future Danger For Economies

I was at a conference recently and there was a speaker who was extolling the power of robots, technology, automation and artificial intelligence (AI) in the modern workplace and how it was going to revolutionise the global economy.

There was quite a catalogue of achievements as a result of increased robotics and AI including lower ‘FTE’ (or ‘Full Time Equivalent’ of human labour) requirements and greater efficiency, productivity and decreased errors and mistakes. These were achievements that were backed by undisputed statistics and data.

The ability to create consistently high economic value using systems, robots and AI which do not make mistakes, which do not break down often, which can even be self-correcting becomes very appealing.

However amidst the glories of robotics and AI, I felt increasingly concerned about where the world was heading with the increased introduction of automation, robotics and AI and the impact this was going to have on employment, social mobility and income equality.

My concerns

Technology as a displacer of jobs.

Technology, automation and robotics initially replaced blue-collar jobs and roles from the economies. Increasingly greater sophistication of AI means that white-collar jobs are also being replaced. We read various reports about the jobs of the future being technology-related roles that help create, maintain and repair robots and their related technology, but I postulate that robots can fix themselves (and their ‘peers’) better than people ever can and over time, robots can create other robots to do the tasks which they need done.

In the past, technology was an enabler. It was a great source of enhanced productivity for nations’ economies.

However, technology has now become a replacer or displacer – of jobs, of people, of roles. It has now become a tool to enhance economic output but ends up depleting people and their earnings.

This is going to be a longer-term fundamental problem and challenge to societal and economic growth and development.

The impact on developing economies

Let us consider Philippines and India. They have spent billions of dollars investing in the infrastructure and ecosystem to help create thriving shared services and business process outsourcing (SSCs / BPOs) businesses. This was to help meet the needs of multinational companies. However, with AI and automation increasingly taking on a majority of the roles and jobs that are currently being done by millions of people in both countries, it is going to lead to a significant job loss and risk the potential collapse of the SSCs and BPO sector in both countries.

Over time, with increasing automation and AI, multinationals need not outsource various roles to locations of lower labour cost. They will instead seek to outsource the roles to nations with the lowest tax and the best technology infrastructures in which they can base their systems and robots. 

The moral obligation and income inequality

With increasing AI and automation, I struggle to see how the job losses faced by millions as a result of robots taking on their roles are going to be mitigated. There also seems to be little alternative sources of formal employment.

Whilst it is easy to highlight how automation can reduce expenses by 66% and reduce ‘FTEs,’ I think we need to look at people beyond merely being an ‘FTE’ or as a mere factor of production.

 

Over time, it is going to also exacerbate the issues of income inequality which is already one of THE pressing moral issues of our time. I’ve covered this topic at length previously.

The factors of production, the technologies, the AI and robots are going to be in the control of a very small segment of society. Whilst it may create vast economic growths, it does not lead to growth in income or wealth for the majority of the people. This will lead to societal fractures which can be devastating to nations and society.

What then the moral obligation to people and society?

Possible solutions?

Leaving this issue to be dealt with purely by market forces will not result in resolution and frankly will be disastrous in my opinion. There needs to be a concerted governmental approach to resolving this and finding solutions that work.

Using levers such as tax policies will be ineffective, particularly in a world with little tax harmonisation. For instance, increased taxation for robotics-led solutions will only encourage a beggar-thy-neighbour policy and in a world with little tax harmonisation, it becomes a useless endeavour.

 

If we accept that robotics and automation are an inalienable part of the development of society, then we need to accept that the current economic models  will not be best suited for what the world needs. Maybe it is time for us to seriously consider and contemplate universal income as a way to mitigate and tackle some of the problems coming our way as a result of robotics and automation.

Universal income is something a number of countries are experimenting with to tackle income inequality which as I’ve explained earlier will only be growing with greater automation and robotics. Finland for instance has started a pilot programme, the Swiss held a referendum in June 2016 to consider universal basic income which did not pass as only a quarter of the Swiss agreed with it, the Dutch will be carrying out a pilot programme this year, and this is just a start.

What is increasingly clear is that it is not enough to simply hope the challenges brought on by AI and robotics are going to go away, there needs to be a concerted and strident efforts made to mitigate them.

National flags of Japan and China (R) are displayed at Tokyo's Haneda Airport on May 30, 2010. Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao is on a three-day visit to Japan to hold talks with his  Japanese counterpart Yukio Hatoyama and business leaders.  AFP PHOTO/Kazuhiro NOGI

China / Japan? History repeating itself?

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Too far fetched?

Let’s consider briefly the facts and also some important caveats.

Population demographics

The results of a census taken in 2015 has placed Japan’s population at just over 127 million – a decline of about 1 million in about 5 years. Japan’s birth rate has been long below the total fertility ratio of 2.1 (currently 1.4) and nearly a third of all Japanese citizens are now over 65. This is already a source of policy and economic challenges for Japan and one that is likely to keep growing.

China’s one-child policy starting in the 70s has had a major impact. Whilst the policy has now been relaxed, the population control genie, once out of the bottle can rarely be controlled. Changing economic trends, mindset shifts, and a movement towards an urban citizenry means less people are keen on having children. The United Nations estimates that that the number of Chinese over 65 will increase by 85% to 243 million in 2030 (from the current 131 million). The Chinese working population saw its biggest decline in 2015 – a fall by a record 4.87 million.

Both Japan and China have very restrictive and insular immigration policies which will only serve to further exacerbate the population and demographic challenges. These demographic issues will also impact economic growth and development as in time both economies will have inverted population pyramids, where one active working individual will be supporting two parents and four grandparents – and better medical facilities and healthcare will lead to a greater demand on the working population.

Perhaps the spur in investment in robotics will help alleviate these challenges?

Economic growth history

Japan’s economic growth started with the development of its manufacturing base following World War Two with support from the USA and other Allied nations. Japan’s growth was an average of 9% between 1955 and 1973 (when the first ‘oil shock’ impeded growth).

In the case of China, following a debilitating post-war economic situation and the challenges of the Cultural Revolution, the opening up and reformation of the economic system from 1978 was instrumental in China’s economic story. China’s growth has averaged between 7% and 10% since.

The main engine of growth both in the case of Japan and subsequently China was manufacturing. It will surprise users of top-notch Japanese products today to learn that from the 1950s to around the 80s, ‘Made in Japan’ meant low-quality and cheap and people preferred to use American or European produced goods. However, the Japanese investment into their manufacturing processes, research and development over time meant that they started developing high-value and high-quality goods and products. It’s a process that took decades and systemic investment into innovation.

In the case of China-made products, there are still some challenges around quality and value, but this is something that is being addressed as we now increasingly see greater investment into research and innovation.

Funding world’s developing needs

Japan became development donor from as early as the mid-50s and by the early 90s, Japan became one of the largest officual development assistance (ODA) providers in the world. Grants, aids and soft loans were provided through agencies such as the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) to countries across Asia, Latin America and Africa.

Japan then became instrumental in the establishment of the Asian Development Bank (an institution for which it has maintained presidency since inception in the 60s).

This allowed Japan to project its soft-power and help foster policies favourable to Japan across recipient nations.

If we examine China’s development assistance, aid and grants – it has grown from less than US$1 billion in 2002 to over $25 billion in 2007 to currently over US$100 billion. Due to differences in the way ODAs are valued, it is possible that China’s current aid and grants may be undervalued.

China also was instrumental in the set-up of the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) with an express aim of building infrastructure across Asia-Pacific. Whilst both ADB and AIIB officials have been at pains to stress that they do not see each other as competitors (indeed they have already co-financed a number of projects), a primary reason why the AIIB was set up so as to have greater autonomy by China and other partners in multilateral banking institutions.

Slowing growth and liquidity trap

In the late 80s, Japan was running a very large trade surplus and the stock market and property prices were booming (there were properties which were valued at US$1.5 million per square meter – or ten square feet in Ginza!) which collapsed in the 90s. There was an asset bubble across both the stock and property markets and when the bubbles burst, it led to the loss of trillions of dollars of value.

Deflation set in and whilst the Japanese government tried its best to promote spending (including setting interest rates at near zero levels), there was little effect. Growth has been anaemic and in 2009 the GDP fell by 5.2%.

Japan found itself stuck in a classic liquidity trap where where its monetary policy had little or no impact on economic output and production levels. This led to the ‘tragedy of Japan’s lost decades.’

Let us now consider China. Relatively easy loans made by banks? Check. Booming property prices? Check. Booming stock market? Check. Corrections across all three areas? Check.

China’s economy has been slowly significantly and it’s GDP growth rate has fallen to a level not seen since 1990. A report from the Wall Street Journal indicated that investors are hoarding cash rather than investing – a classic sign of a liquidity trap. The stock market debacle in Shanghai in 2015/2016 has also dampened investor enthusiasm.

The Chinese Communist Party Politburo has also cautioned against debt-fuelled growth and rising asset bubbles. There is also evidence to suggest that the stimulus packages initiated by the government are having little impact.

Some key differences.

Whilst there are some similarities, it is important to note a number of major differences and caveats before any quick conclusions are made. Firstly, China starts off with a much bigger population base and the reverberations from the impacts will take a much longer time before they are felt.

Secondly, China’s political system lends itself to a greater continuity in policies which may be effective in warding off economic downturns and avoid ‘lost decades’ the likes which Japan went through. Japan on the other hand went through nine prime ministers in the 11 years between 1989 and 2000 which hardly allows for lasting measures and policies.

In order to avoid the liquidity trap challenges, the Chinese government will need to focus on its war against graft and corruption and instil trust in the public institutions. Long-term and difficult policy decisions in the areas of state-owned enterprises reform need to be made in order to boost productivity. There needs to be continued efforts to keep narrowing the inequality gap and create greater employment opportunities which will in turn boost spending and help deter deflation.

The road ahead is a difficult one but there is no reason for history to repeat itself as long as the mistakes of the past are not repeated.

 

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The Indonesian Connection – Islam in South Africa

 

During my exploration in the beautiful city of Cape Town, I came across a most remarkable tale. It is the story of one man’s perseverance against immense odds and the profound influence he left on a society hundreds of years later.

It is the story of how Islam spread in South Africa, from Cape Town through a man from Indonesia who was jailed in Robben Island (the very same island another great man was jailed for 27 years almost two centuries later – Nelson Mandela) by the Dutch. Globalisation was very much a part of life then as it is now! Robben Island also has now the dubious distinction of having hosted (against their will) of a number of great reformers!

This is the story of how the Auwal Mosque came to be in the Bo-Kaap (the Cape Malay part of Cape Town) and the fascinating tale of a man fondly known by all as Tuan Guru (or Sir Teacher in Malay).

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Auwal Mosque, Bo-Kaap, Cape Town

Tuan Guru or Imam Abdullah Qadhu Abdus Salaam (born 1712)was a man belonging to royalty from the Sultanate of Tidore ( part of the Maluku Islands in Indonesia). Abdullah led the Indonesian resistance against the Dutch invasion in the 1700s until he was finally captured along with a handful of other Indonesian resistance fighters. (It is worth bearing in mind that the Dutch East India Company brought slaves, political exiles and other prisoners from India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Ceylon amongst other places to South Africa from the 1700s onwards).

The Dutch made it a point to remove all religious paraphernalia especially the Quran from Abdullah and his men before they were sent into exile to Robben Island. The rationale for this was that by removing Islamic religious material, Abdullah will not be able to propagate Islam in South Africa and in the process curtail his ability to lead a religious resistance against them.

Abdullah was incarcerated in Robben Island from 1780 to 1792. Now, the Dutch were confident that Abdullah’s ability to preach Islam was going to be limited due to the lack of religious materials. However what they failed to understand that merely removing the Quran physically from Abdullah wasn’t going to be sufficient because Imam Abdullah was a hafiz or someone who had committed the entire Quran to memory.

During his time on Robben Island, Imam Abdullah wrote several copies of the Quran entirely from memory, two of which are preserved top this day. One of the handwritten copies is now on display at the Auwal Mosque in Bo-Kaap in Cape Town. Imam Abdullah also wrote a book on Islamic Jurisprudence which became a reference manual for Muslims in South Africa in the 18th and 19th centuries. Imam Abdullah did not allow his incarceration to fulfill what he felt was his manifest destiny nor quench his zeal to remain free spiritually whilst he was imprisoned.

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One of the remaining copies of the handwritten Quran by Tuan Guru at the Auwal Mosque in Bo-Kaap, Cape Town

When Imam Abdullah was released, he was already 81 but that did not dampen his enthusiasm nor his sense of purpose. He stayed on in Bo-Kaap in Cape Town and started the first madarasah or Islamic School and he taught Islam and Arabic to freed slaves. Over time, he also organised prayers and established the first mosque, the Auwal mosque in 1794

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Tuan Guru (Imam Abdullah) teaching children at his madrasah. An mural in Bo-Kaap, Cape Town

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It is worth bearing in mind that the practice or indeed the propagation of Islam was deemed a criminal offence until 1804. It was Tuan Guru’s unstinting efforts that led to the establishment of the first mosque in Southern Africa.

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Auwal Mosque (est 1794) in Bo-Kaap, Cape Town
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Interior of Auwal Mosque

Imam Abdullah or Tuan Guru died when he was 95 (in 1807) and left behind the foundations of what is Islam in South Africa today. Tuan Guru remains a testament to the indomitable spirit and will to effect change in a society despite the challenges and opposition to any reforms. This remains inspiring today as it was over two centuries ago.

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Mural depicting the development of Islam in South Africa, Bo-Kaap, Cape Town
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Dhanushkodi Dreams

I had the pleasure of visiting the most south-eastern tip of Rameshwaram, a place called Dhanushkodi (a word which means ‘tip of the bow’ as the Ramayana epic has Lord Rama marking this as the spot to connect Sri Lanka to India with the tip if his bow). This entire village was destroyed almost to the day on the 23rd of December 1964, 52 years ago by the Rameshwaram Cyclone of 1964.

This area is under just 30 kilometers from Sri Lanka (Talaimannar) and was a bustling port city during British rule. It is also a spot where the Palk Strait and the Gulf of Mannar meet. The ruins of a bustling port city can still be seen here and is a reminder of how immensely powerful nature can be. This area remains fairly difficult to reach but efforts are being made to make it more accessible for people to reach and regale in the beauty of the place.

My forefathers used to ply the trade route between India and Sri Lanka through Dhanushkodi and it was a thoroughly humbling experience being here.

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The Wheels Are Off – the Italian Referendum Results

The majority of Italians have voted against the constitutional reforms proposed in a national referendum and Italian Premier Matteo Renzi’s “experience of government” is now over as he steps down.

The Italian economy has been like a Ferrari with its wheels slashed – its economic performance has been the worst amongst any of the Eurozone country with the exception of Greece; it’s government loans sit at 130% of GDP and unemployment exceeds 11%.

This failure of the referendum is now akin to the Ferrari with its wheels completely off the axle – and the casualties won’t just be the Italians in the Ferrari but indeed the whole of the Eurozone.

Early indicators are that the Euro has fallen sharply against the Dollar and the Asian markets are spooked by what is to come from Europe.

What does this result mean for Italy, Europe and the world?

1. Brace for a hard landing of the banking sector.

We could see the demise of a few banks in Italy, starting with the Monte dei Paschi di Siena (MPS) – the world’s oldest bank – which has already lost almost 90% of its value this year. MPS is already one of Europe’s weakest banks and they are subject to a bailout plan which may now not come to fruition.

Italian banks are struggling with about €360 billion of bad loans and are significantly undercapitalised. There will be a huge sell-off of Italian and European banking stock once the markets open.

The problem is that the scale of interconnectedness means that a hit to the Italian banking system will leave a trail of destruction across the rest of the European and global banking sector starting with the largest European lenders such as Deutsche Bank.

2. The EU and Euro are both going to go through an existentialist phase

Brexit dealt a big blow to the EU project. The rise of the Five Star Movement, a Eurosceptic opposition which has already claimed ‘victory’ in this referendum means that over time their views on EU and the Euro are going to gain even further traction. Even if the Five Star Movement do not win in any early elections called as a result of this referendum (they have a campaign promise to hold another referendum on Italy’s membership within the EU), their views are going to be, over time, become mainstream.

3. Imposition of capital controls?

In 2015 we saw capital controls applied in Greece to stop a run on the banking system and see a flood of capital out of the country. A run on the Italian banking sector will have a colossal impact and a pre-emptive series of capital controls, though damaging from a reputational perspective, may be required for reasons of survival.

4. An Italian sneeze will cause an European contagion.

This result will no doubt cause another slump in the Eurozone economy and will cause a negative investment sentiment. Unemployment will continue rising and living standards will fall, not just in Italy but across Europe.

The people have spoken and have demonstrated a willingness to face a hard landing. Whether they are prepared for a hard reset is another matter altogether and this is going to be the start of a period of extreme uncertainty, economic uncertainty and hardship.

What Italy needs now is an expert driver who is going to be able to manouvere the Ferrari with no wheels skillfully so that it causes the least damage both to the Ferrari’s passengers and other Eurozone travellers.