bolsa familia

Challenging poverty the Brazilian way

An amazing revolution has been taking place in Brazil over the last decade – one that could save the world. This revolution was done against the advice of experts from leading institutions such as the World Bank and leading academics.

This revolution, named Bolsa Família has had a huge transformational shift in the fight against inequality and poverty across Brazil. It was based on a simple premise that if you place cash in the hands of the extremely poor and have faith that they will do the right thing, then good things will happen and transform their lives and fortunes.

It was rolled out by a President, Luiz Inacio Lua da Silva (or Lula), who was of the poor and understood what it meant to be poor and therefore had the belief that the Bolsa Família scheme will shape the life of millions.

There is a fantastic article written about it in the Foreign Affairs magazine (by J. Tepperman) for those who want to find out more (this post was inspired by the article). Below are some key highlights about how the Bolsa Família works, how it helped move millions out of poverty, reduce income inequality and radically transform a society.

First – the situation in Brazil before the Bolsa Família

  • In 2000, a third of Brazil’s population of 175 million people lived below the poverty line (under US$2 a day) and 15% were deemed to be indigent (living under US$1.25 a day)
  • By 2010, over 40 million people had moved from below the poverty line to the middle class.
  • Income inequality has also dropped significantly in that time

What led to the birth of the Bolsa Família?

In 2003, a man who was born into an extremely poor family and started his professional life as a shoeshiner became the President of Brazil. This was the time of Luiz Inácio Lua da Silva, or Lula for short.lula-bolsa

When Lula was campaigning for Presidency, he was reviled by the business community and foreign banks. Foreign investors were backing off and international banks were cutting credit.

Goldman Sachs even came up with the ‘Lulameter’ – a meter that predicted an inverse relationship between Lula’s popularity and Brazil’s economic future.

Lula was committed to social policies that benefited all of Brazil rather than just the elite and launched a far-reaching social programme called Fome Zero (“Zero Hunger”) and at the centre of this campaign was the Bolsa Família or Family Grant.

This was a revolutionary and ground-breaking anti-poverty effort that transformed a society and has inspired many similar programmes.

How does the Bolsa Família work?

Rather than provide the poor with perks and benefits which sometimes has the effect of increasing the layers of corruption and bureaucracy, the idea was to simply give the poor money.bolsa_familia_foto_felipe_gesteira_0067

In most developing countries, the poor are given subsidies or physical items such as food or basic tools and equipment which tended to be a largely inefficient process that only engendered a culture of patronage.

The Bolsa Familía was a programme which was easy to qualify for.

If a family proved that it lived in extreme poverty and earned less than 50 Brazilian reais ($42) or 100 reais ($84) per person per month, they will be eligible for the scheme.

An average family gets $65 cash and the benefits tops off at $200. To obtain the cash, families needed to go to a bank and draw the money from their own accounts There were no middleman handing them the cash and they had full control over the receipt and expenditure of the cash.

Whilst getting into the programme itself was easy, staying in required that the beneficiaries signed up to a range of conditions or contrapartidas (counterpart responsibility). Some of these included:

  • Ensuring all the children between six and fifteen years old attended school at least 85% of the time
  • All children got immunisation
  • Both mothers and children got regular medical check-ups
  • Pregnant women needed to get prenatal care and breastfeed their children.

President Lula was determined to break the intergenerational trap – and ensure that parents gave their children a better head start and advantages which they themselves may not have enjoyed.

This social contract between the government and the beneficiaries meant broadly there was a greater adherence to the conditions.

There were also strict penalties for those who did not comply and non-compliance meant being first suspended from the programme before being completely struck-off for continued transgressions.

 

The initial sceptics

When Lula launched the programme, he faced very highly qualified cynics and naysayers, economists and development agency experts who thought the notion of giving cash directly to the poor will be misspent and be ineffective as they felt it created a culture of dependency and that the poor will spend the money on alcohol and other demerit goods.

However, the visionary Lula had the right idea when he mentioned to J. Tepperman:

“The number one teacher in my life was a woman who born and died illiterate: my mother. With all due respect to experts and academics, they knew very little about the poor. They know a lot about statistics, but that’s different, sabe?

To an intellectual, putting $50 into the hands of a poor person is charity, an academic has no idea about what a poor person can do with it. But that’s because at university, they don’t teach you how to care for the poor. And it’s because most experts have never experienced what the poor go through every day. They’ve had to work without breakfast. They’ve never lived in a flooded house, or had to wait three hours at a bus stop. To experts, a social problem like inequality is only numbers.”

 

A policy that favours the poor favours all

Whilst Lula and the policy’s opponents and economists were convinced this hugely controversial policy was going to be a terrible idea, Lula was convinced in his belief that this was the right thing to do. He also had a strong notion that putting cash into the hands of the poor will help them participate in market economics and help the economy grow.

Lula remarked: “When millions can go to the supermarket to buy milk, to buy break, the economy will work better. The miserable will become consumers.”

The premise was simple: If the poor start spending, businesses benefit, social ills go down and society as a whole improves.

 

The fantastic outcomes that transformed a society

  • Bolsa Familía now supports 14 million families (or 55 million Brazilians)
  • It has reached a quarter of Brazil’s population and 85% of the poor.
  • The small payments have helped double the incomes of Brazil’s most destitute.
  • In the first three years of the programme, extreme poverty was cut by 15%.
  • Income inequality has also reduced by a third as a result of the Bolsa Familía. The poorest 20% saw their incomes rise by 6.2% while the richest 20% saw growth of only 2.6%. (In contract, in the US, the richest 10% grew their wealth by 2.6% while the poorest 10% actually saw their wealth decrease by 8.6%).
  • Vaccination rate has increased to 99% of the population.
  • Malnutrition amongst children has reduced by 16%. Infant mortality dropped by 40% over the last decade, with deaths from malnutrition dropping by almost two-thirds – the sharpest decline anywhere in the world.
  • Children of Bolsa Familía recipients have graduation rates that are double that of poor Brazilian children who are not in the programme.
  • The number of children forced to work has reduced by 14%.

When the Bolsa Familía was originally launched, opponents of the programme were of the view that it was going to drain the national coffers and be a huge drain on public finances. However, the entire programme has cost the government less than half a percent of Brazil’s annual GDP. In 2011, a study by the British Government also demonstrated that cash-transfer programmes like the Bolsa Famiía cost 30% less per person than traditional aid programs.

Further evidence has also shown that for every real disbursed by the government towards the Bolsa Familía programme, it has increased Brazil’s GDP by 1.7 reais!

Where next?

Ultimately the recipients of the Bolsa Familía have said that rather than feel stigmatised and shamed, they have felt pride in being enrolled into the programme. The programme has allowed parents to give their children a good life and in the process given them greater autonomy, independence and above all, dignity.

This is an important facet of development which sometimes gets lost when viewed through the lens of economic analysis and statistics – that people need a sense of dignity and a programme that recognises this will ultimately be successful and be a driver of societal benefits.

The Bolsa Familía has become a pioneering programme that is inspiring many more countries and cities around the world – indeed Brazilian government officials responsible for the Bolsa Familía delivery are providing training and seminars for others seeking to emulate them. It is not just the emerging economies of the world learning from Brazil, but even major American cities like New York, which only goes to show that addressing poverty and inequality is THE policy issue that needs to be urgently addressed.

Social mobility and breaking intergenerational poverty and illiteracy traps are fundamental areas that need to be addressed by leaders and policymakers, in countries rich and poor.

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Ethics and making a mockery of the Hippocratic Oath

Reading this case of an unprofessional and unethical doctor in Singapore provided me with some food for thought, particularly around the increasing role of ethics and professionalism, particularly in a world of increasing inequality.

It is critical that the vulnerable segments of society are given the appropriate levels of care and support because where unethical and unprofessional behaviours exist, they tend to exacerbate the suffering upon the vulnerable. Kudos also to the Humanitarian Organisation for Migration Economics (HOME) for pursuing this vigorously on behalf of the victim.

The case itself was interesting. Here was a doctor, Dr. David Wong Him Choon, a noted orthopaedic surgeon at Raffles Hospital, who chose to give only two days of medical leave for a foreign worker who had fractured his hand and had undergone surgery. There is increasing concern that there are doctors who are acting in collusion with construction companies to minimise the time off taken by their workers and to also limit their liabilities for compensation.

What is even more interesting/bizarre, is that previously (between June and December 2015) a Disciplinary Tribunal had acquitted Dr Wong of professional misconduct for giving insufficient hospitalisation leave despite the following findings:

  • The tribunal agreed that the appropriate time off (conservatively) for someone with a distal radius fracture was two weeks of medial leave. (Wong had given two days.)
  • The tribunal also agreed that Wong had failed in his duty to discuss with the patient to understand if there were adequate conditions for his rest and rehabilitation.

Despite the above, the Tribunal chose to acquit Wong on the basis of insufficient proof!

This led the Singapore Medical Council (SMC) (to their great credit) to file an appeal to the High Court which subsequently overturned the tribunal’s acquittal of Wong and convicted him of professional misconduct and sentenced him to suspension of medical practice for a period of six months.

Wong’s behaviour is morally reprehensible and runs counter to the Hippocratic Oath which states: “I will remember that there is art to medicine as well as science, and that warmth, sympathy, and understanding may outweigh the surgeon’s knife or the chemist’s drug.”

This raised a few questions for me, namely:

  • What was the composition of the Disciplinary Tribunal that showed such flagrant disregard to evidence, common sense and conventional wisdom and what is their justification for their acquittal of Wong?
  • Whilst Wong has been ordered to pay for the SMC legal and tribunal costs, will Wong also be responsible for the worker’s additional injuries and damages caused as a result of Wong’s unethical and negligent behaviour?
  • Is a six-month suspension/sabbatical a sufficient deterrence? Perhaps in addition to the six-months suspension, there should be a clear statement which suggests he will be struck off permanently for another violation and also be ordered to perform pro-bono activities for migratory workers in Singapore for a period of time. This will be not dissimilar to the Correct Work Orders (CWOs) imposed for a number of other offences in Singapore.
  • In addition to punishment meted out to the doctors, companies and firms, that also are responsible for the prevalence of such despicable practices must also be brought to account and be made an example of.

How a society supports and treats its most vulnerable, its most helpless and its most needy, is an indication of the society’s progress and humanity. A society that is materially wealthy but neglects to look after the concerns of its most helpless is but a poor and miserable one.

 

 

 

 

budget2016_logo

The Singapore Budget 2016 in a nutshell

The Singapore Budget 2016 was announced on the 24th of March 2016 by Finance Minister, Heng Swee Keat.

Below is a simple view of the budget (please click here to download high resolution version):

budget 2016
A summary of the Singapore Budget 2016

Some have claimed that this budget represents a ‘game plan for the next 50 years’ but my view is that this is a very functional budget that sets out a 5-year planning approach.

The budget itself can be split across five areas: support for small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs); Economic Transformation; Social support; Infrastructure Investment; and Individual Taxation.

The main focus of the budget has been primarily around partnership (particularly between government and industry), internationalisation (and support for companies that seek to establish Singapore as a trusted brand) and a transformation of the economy, towards greater efficiency and focus on high value drivers.

Theme of the 2016 Budget: Clarity, Consistency and Compassion

The aims of the government seems to be very much around providing clarity to businesses across a number of areas (from finding relevant grants, to addressing their pressing issues and providing them with the right information to ensure their alignment to the government’s wider aims).

There is also significant consistency with previous policies and measures and little deviation to what has already been established. This includes buttressing of existing policies around SkillsFuture or other social policies.

It is the final theme of compassion that strikes me the most. There is a tacit acknowledgement that social mobility is a critical matter that needs to be addressed urgently. The Deputy Finance Minister in a speech has indicated as much.

Looking at the slew of social-focused policies and support pillars designed to help the underprivileged and support social mobility is important as Singapore enters her 51st year.

Income disparity and social mobility remain the biggest threat to our social systems and to any country’s progress. Putting into place the pillars to enhance mobility is an important investment to ensure the harmonious development of society and nation.

Climate change

One area that could have been addressed in more detail is the impact of climate change and the government’s wider approach to addressing this important area – particularly given the severe consequences this has on Singapore. In time to come, I suspect, governments around the world will start devoting more of the government budget and resources towards addressing this and report on the developments.

The government touched on tax rebates for companies for CSR practices. I hope over time this extends to wider sustainability measures adopted by companies to reduce their carbon footprint.

Big Data and Planning

Another interesting development is the development of the National Trade Platform (NTP) that seeks to integrate all business and finance data of companies. This is going to support the predictive ability of the government in understanding the various levers of economy and also develop more timely and appropriate interventions to support businesses. If done right, the type of data and the insights gained from this initiative could be hugely  influential and something other nations will sit up and take note of in order to have a better handle on their wider economic affairs.

 

(C) PromptCloud

The Chinese Skynet!

You struggle to get around any board room meetings or conferences without the phrase “big data” being used like it is the panacea to all the woes businesses and the economy faces.

However, big data is equally relevant to governments, particularly, in light of Edward Snowden’s revelations.

I read a very interesting article a fortnight back on this very topic: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-03-03/china-tries-its-hand-at-pre-crime.

Essentially the Chinese government is looking to building a profiling tool that includes jobs, hobbies, consumption habits, along with details of any other unorthodox behaviour to detect potential/future subversive, criminal or terrorist behaviour.

What’s equally interesting from the article is that there has been, from Mao’s time, a secret file called the dangán, which has records about everyone, from details of their schools, personality assessments to health records, and can determine whether one gets that job promotion or government permit!

There is also a Chinese national network of surveillance cameras called Skynet!

The combination of this surveillance will allow for the Chinese government to analyse, interrogate and assess the data from her 1.2 billion citizens in order to detect future criminal, terrorist or subversive behaviour. However, the challenge that remains is how one can be prosecuted for ‘thoughtcrime’? At what point does the prosecution take place?

All in a very interesting legal and social conundrum!

 

 

 

 

 

dabba

Where technology lost to tradition

Over the last few decades we have seen numerous examples where technology has usurped tradition, leading to plenty of hands wringing, worrying and eventually acceptance of technology’s dominance over the things that we previously thought were ‘the way things are done’ or tradition.

From going to a travel agency, or flagging for a taxi, or buying takeouts , we have now ditched habits and activities that were previously taken to be the de-facto way.

In the light of these changes (and some undoubtedly have had a huge benefit in people’s lives), it was interesting (and perhaps heartening) to read an example of how tradition managed to stand strong in the face of overwhelming technological progress and indeed even strike a blow and reign supreme!

This is the curious tale of the dabbawalas.  A recent Bloomberg Business article, Startups Haven’t Replaced India’s 19th Century Food Delivery Service (February 3, 2016), highlighted how over 400 technology/app driven businesses backed by over US$120 million of funding  have failed to dislodge a 120-year old, traditional food delivery enterprise. The aspiring new-age disruptors failed to make a dent whilst single-handedly decimating traditional black cab/taxi or travel industries.

Only a handful of 400 food-delivery-tech start-ups are still in business after having lost much of the VC funding and thousands of staff, despite spending millions on technology, promotion and advertising.

I thought it would be useful to take a closer look at the conditions that have led to the enduring success of these dabbawalas (from ‘dabba’ which means lunch box or tiffin carriers – the ubiquitous multi-layered carrier tins; and ‘wala’ which loosely means man or deliverer leading to ‘dabbawala’ – lunch box delivery man).

First some context and history to the humble dabbawala:mumbai-dabbawala

  • Starting from 1890, no rain nor flood nor natural disaster nor riot not terrorist strike nor weather has stopped the dabbawalas in fulfilling their duties.
  • The business model has remained exactly the same since the very first delivery: food prepared at home or community kitchens are delivered to students and workers in schools, offices, factories and depots in a lunch/tiffin carriers, and the empty containers are returned!
  • 5,000 dabbawalas now deliver about 175,000 to 200,000 meals a day (or over 50 million meals a year)
  • They have only ever gone on strike once in over a 120 years – and even then timed it on a public holiday – and in support of an anti-corruption campaign!
  • Each dabba or lunch box changes hands at least six times in transit before it reaches the final consumer – or 2.4 million transactions per day (200,000 deliveries X minimum 6 transits X 2 – to return the lunch/tiffin box back)
  • There are some claims that the dabbawalas lose only one tiffin box per 1.6 million deliveries (comfortably allowing them to be within the six-sigma standard of 3.4 defects per million transactions) – despite the absolute lack of technology or apps to support them. All that is used is a system of alphanumeric codes to identify the source and destination of each dabba.

Next, let’s consider the business and employment model used by the dabbawalas:

dabbawalas1

  • The monthly service charge for the delivery of the lunch boxes is between 400 to 1,200 rupees (or between US$6 to US$18 monthly).
  • The prices are not based on distance but on the customers’ ability to pay – deliveries from richer neighbourhoods means higher rates.
  • There are about 200 ‘managers’ who act as supervisors to teams of up to 25 dabbawalas – managing the total 5,000 dabbawalas
  • The dabbawalas age ranges from between 18 to 65 and are often poorly educated (often rarely receiving formal education beyond the age of 14 or 8th standard in Indian education terms)
  • The dabbawalas continue to be paid low wages – approximately 8000 rupees (or about US$120 monthly) but have achieved a very low attrition rate or labour turnover.
  • Each dabbawala receives the same income, irrespective of experience, age or number of customers serves.
  • Each dabbawala is not an employee, but is an entrepreneur and equal shareholder in the Dabbawallah Trust.
  • The dabbawalas employ a risk-mitigation system of a KYC (know your customer) principle to prevent the threats of contraband or bombs being delivered and implement a minimum monthly-subscription rule.

 

So how have these poorly educated, lowly paid individuals without any access to any computer or app to support their delivery system become an award-wining group of process champions?

  • The dabbawalas have been the paragons of social entrepreneurship – leading to social mobility through enterprise. They have provided employment opportunities for those who have needed it the most. The late Paul Goodman, Professor of Organisational Psychology at the Carnegie Mellon University, described it as thus: “They provide a different picture — a complicated system of working built around human ingenuity and supportive social arrangements that has long been absent from U.S. industry,” in his documentary on dabbawalas.

 

  • Uncompromising attitude to cutting out waste or preventing excesses – this has led to the dabbawalas rejecting a number of potentially lucrative marketing or sales opportunities because it was deemed that they will take up time and impact their core business of delivering on time every time.

 

  • Culture – there is an unwavering commitment to their cause.

The dabbawalas are of a view that their duty is akin to service to God. They are committed to the last man towards a single principle of delivering food on time to the right person.

As Manish Tripathi, a director of the Mumbai Dabbawalas states, “Our work revolves around a few beliefs – the most important ones of which are sticking to time and believing that work is worship. Annadan is mahadan (giving food is the greatest charity). We dabbawalas have a strong belief in god. But you don’t see god, do you? So, whom do you worship? People – after all, they are creations of god. You worship god by ensuring that people get to eat their food on time.”

Professor Stefan Thomke of Harvard Business School notes in his paper, “Culture, for example, often gets short shrift. Too few mangers seem to recognise that they should nurture their organisations as communities – not just because they care about employees but because doing so will maximise productive and creativity, and reduce risk.

 

  • Superior focus on organisational objectives and customer service

There is an absolute focus on unerring time management logistics and commitment to superior customer service through accuracy.

An interesting anecdote is when the dabbawalas were informed that Prince Charles wanted to meet with them, they allowed for the request on the condition that Prince Charles should be at Mumbai’s Churchgate station between 11.20 am and 11.40 am. The mere 20 minutes were given because “they could not take time off work” and only because that was the short period of the day when the dabbawalas had a rare moment of a break time!

Prince Charles Dabbawalas

(As an aside, it is also worth noting that of the three indians invited to Charles’ wedding – two were dabbawallahs (who presented gifts for Camilla (sari) and Charles (turban) – paid for by the dabbawallas pooling)

 

  • Effective leadership

The managers (each managing up to 25 dabbawalas) do not see themselves as leaders or supervisors. They are individuals who help to continuously improve the work-place practices and systems and empower their teams to make decisions within a clearly defined set of parameters. The individual dabbawalas make rapid decisions (modern managers may label this ‘agile’).

There are regular meetings once a month where decisions are made and issues identified and discussed. In the rare event of an error, an investigation is launched to ensure it doesn’t occur again and customers are refunded.

 

  • Adopting new practices to serve customer better

Whilst the delivery model has remained the same, the dabbawalas have introduced innovations such as delivery booking through SMS, online booking (through www.mydabbawala.com) and also introduced online customer services feedback. The customer-centric approach that has been instrumental to the success of the dabbawalas continues.

 

The secret to the dabbawalas is best described by Professor Thomke who says, “The dabbawalas have an overall system whose basic pillars – organisation, management, process and culture – are perfectly aligned and mutually reinforcing. In the corporate world, it’s uncommon for managers to strive for that kind of synergy.”

In this day and age, where the human touch is going out of fashion, the dabbawalas remain a source of inspiration and there is much to be learnt from them.

Branson dabbawalas

As Richard Branson (who spent a full day with the dabbawalas) said, “I will tell my employees: walk like a dabbawala.

Indeed!

dabbawalk

072 community network - rikilo - fotolia

Going beyond networks and building communities

As someone who works for a leading global professional body dedicated to delivering public value to society on behalf of its members, I’ve been thinking about the notion of networks, what it means and whether the emphasis should be around going beyond the notion of mere networks and building communities with a strong sense of ownership by its constituent members supported by active engagement and dialogue.

Numerous businesses have built themselves formidable networks with their customer base but could be missing out on significant advantages in evolving those networks into communities.

Wenger, Trayer and De Laat, (2011) have provided clear definitions illustrating the differences between a network and a community:

“The network aspect refers to the set of relationships, personal interactions, and connections among participants who have personal reasons to connect. It is viewed as a set of nodes and links with affordances for learning, such as information flows, helpful linkages, joint problem solving, and knowledge creation.


“The community aspect refers to the development of a shared identity around a topic or set of challenges. It represents a collective intention – however tacit and distributed – to steward a domain of knowledge and to sustain learning about it.”

 

Distinguishing a network and a community

A network is inherently a passive set of relationships and connections (normally anonymous) between individuals, which is geared towards only information flows, and transactions across the connections. Networks tend to be primarily transactional in nature (mainly through the consumption of services and goods) with little by way of value creation.

Communities on the other hand lend themselves well to action and intervention by individuals who are connected around a shared identity, philosophy or collective intention. Communities tend to inspire a sense of camaraderie and collective action by the participants who belong to it.

 

What this means for businesses

Companies that successfully are able to develop and build on their networks and transform them into communities will be able to not only enjoy the scale afforded by networks but also improve the level of dialogue, engagement and sales which in turn improves the margins, leading to better business value.

Essentially:

Networks = High volume X Low margins (due to mainly transactional nature of mostly one way transactions)

Communities = High volume X Higher margins (due to improved dialogue, satisfaction which in turn leads to higher sales and possibly margins)

If we consider the largest companies in the world such as Amazon, they don’t merely seek to develop a large customer base who go to them to buy the products they seek. Instead they have invested significantly towards developing communities within their sales platforms, leading to improved two-way dialogue, and encouraging greater sales of a larger range of products.

Facebook has gone beyond simply creating networks and their initiatives such as “On this day” and “Friends’ Day” are all geared towards engaging their networks towards a more meaningful community, to imbue a sense of camaraderie and fellowship amongst their users. This is what will support the longevity of a social network like Facebook and ensure they avoid the mistakes made by the likes of MySpace and FriendsUnited, which did not seek to go beyond the creation of networks.

Superior organisations take the networks they have, understand the key propositions their networks seek, develop their messages further, engage them better, enhance the levels of dialogue across the participants of the network, and in the process form the basis of a community that will sustain the business towards long term value.

 

 

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The Triumvirate of Technology, Education and Employability – Solving the Policy Riddle

I has the privilege to speak at the ACCA Asia Pacific Future Education Summit in Beijing earlier this month (January 2016).

 

Slide1

During the course of my presentation I touched on the changing trends in learning, the impact of technology on learning and jobs and ACCA’s response to these global changes.

Below are my thoughts on this critical triumvirate of technology, education and employability and how it will help resolve some of our major policy issues and challenges of the day.

 

Slide3

Young people today are three times as likely as their parents to be out of work.

I have been considering this very urgent issue of employability and the growing ‘employability gap’: the fact that the skills students have as they leave our educational institutions aren’t meeting the expectations of employers, and that employers also want wider, softer skills as well as demonstration of knowledge and hard competencies.

It is also my view that technology is often woefully underexploited when it comes to giving students the opportunity to develop their professional skills.

 

Slide4

Globally 75 million young people are out of employment. The issue of employability is not one limited to a certain geography or country. Below are some of the main challenges across some of the major nations/regions of the world.

INDIA

According to a survey conducted by the Singapore Management University (SMU) in conjunction with Indian partners, it was felt that the employability of Indian graduates is low due to skill and geographical mismatch.

The survey also concluded that this gap can be bridged by digitisation of learning.

It is worth noting that the employability ratio of management graduates was only 15 per cent, engineering (20 per cent), law (14 per cent) and medical graduates (32 per cent).

JAPAN

An estimated 700,000 young people, known as hikikomori, have withdrawn from society and rarely leave home. These individuals have collectively withdrawn from the economic population of the country as a result of employability and the subsequent marginalisation.

EUROPE

Across the 28 countries of the European Union, unemployment among 15- to 24-year-olds was 22 percent in 2014/2015. The lack of prospects in the job market for young people is a serious problem in large parts of the EU. The highest unemployment rates are found in the south of Europe.Spain has the highest rate, with half of 15- to 24-year-olds out of work. In Portugal, Cyprus, Italy, Croatia and Greece a little more than one in three people in this age group are out of work.

CHINA

According to a study by McKinsey, the number of students graduating each year from university or vocational school has risen from 1 million a year in 2000 to 6.1 million in 2011. This stunning increase means that the number of new graduates exceeds demand for their services in many areas of the country, resulting in an unemployment rate of 16.4 percent for college graduates.

McKinsey also estimate that by 2020, Chinese employers will demand 142 million more high-skilled workers—those with university degrees or vocational training—or about 24 million more than the country will likely supply. Companies could fill this high-skilled labor gap with less-skilled workers, but this would result in productivity losses or poorer quality products and services. Other companies may leave roles unfilled, delaying the decision to grow or expand.

The study estimates that if China does not bridge this gap by 2020, the opportunity cost could reach some $250 billion (about 2.3 percent of GDP)—which is almost the same as that of Singapore or Malaysia’s GDP! That’s a very large amount of money to put at risk – not to mention the impact on social welfare and harmony.

Slide5

There are a few reasons as to why this employability gap exists.

The first reason is a difference in what employers want from graduates and what they are getting. Surveys of employers consistently show that they are not satisfied with the skill levels of their new tertiary hires, whether these are graduates of universities or vocational schools. The main complaints, according to McKinsey research (and a wealth of anecdotal evidence), are lack of technical training, inadequate English, and deficient soft skills, such as the ability to work in teams, critical thinking, and innovative flair. For instance in China, in 2013, more than a third of employers in China surveyed said they struggled to recruit skilled workers, with 61 percent of these companies attributing this to a shortage of general employability skills.

A second mismatch has to do with the knowledge requirements of the future and the structural makeup of the workforce. As countries’ evolve their underlying economic models, their labour needs shift as well and the resultant demand for higher skilled talent is not met by the status-quo educational systems.

Thirdly is one of a geographic mismatch. There are instances where the universities in certain countries tend to be concentrated in an area and this leads to a distribution problem as there are other areas where there are not enough universities to support the demand.

There is also a large question about how the education and training system also operates in. In a number of countries, there is growing concern—among parents, employers, and policymakers alike—that the system’s emphasis on rote learning and focus solely on exam performance does not foster the mental agility and innovative flair that the modern work place requires.

Slide6

Therefore as you see, employability is a very real and serious issue that has serious economic and social consequences.

But before we proceed, it may be useful to have a brief view of what we mean by employability skills.

I have here a list which is not meant to be exhaustive but provides a flavour for some of the skill sets and capabilities we need to consider when talking about employability.

  1. Communication skills that contribute to productive and harmonious relations between employees and customers.
  2. Team work skills that contribute to productive working relationships and outcomes both within teams, the organisation and with external parties.
  3. Problem-solving skills that contribute to productive outcomes and with a commitment to finding solutions.
  4. Initiative and enterprise skills that contribute to innovative outcomes and driving stronger business performance
  5. Planning and organising skills that contribute to long-term and short-term strategic planning and building the processes to achieve desired outcomes
  6. Self-management skills that contribute to employee satisfaction and growth and ensuring they contribute to their organisation’s well-being in the process.
  7. Learning skills that contribute to ongoing development.
  8. Technology skills that the modern workplace requires.

Slide7

Institutions and organisations tackle student employability in a number of ways, including through for example through professional experience requirements,  and employability modules, careers services, work-placements and experiences, work-based mentors, volunteering and increasingly through looking at employability awards. We know there is already some excellent practice, particularly in vocational and professional disciplines where notions of ‘what it is to be professional’ are embedded in the curriculum, but for others this is less apparent. Few use technology really effectively in an integrated way to support student employability, although some are exploring this.

There is evidence of an ‘employability gap’ in the skills that students are actually starting with on day one of employment and the skills that employers are expecting from them. However, there is an increasing appreciation that ’technology for employability’ can provide many potential benefits to students, institutions and employers

Digitally savvy graduates are essential for shaping tomorrow’s entrepreneurial activities, but digital literacies aren’t well articulated.

Slide8

The nature of knowledge is changing and, in this digital age, our definition of basic literacy urgently needs expanding. The notion of digital literacy – those capabilities that equip an individual for living, learning and working in a digital society – is one that needs to be taken seriously by education providers and consider how it can be an enabler for employability.

Technology acts as an enabler in supporting employability in the following ways:

  • ensuring that opportunities are provided throughout the curriculum in a scaffolded and supported way for learners to reflect, plan, and articulate and showcase their knowledge and skills in an integrated way
  • embedding digital literacy skills more broadly across the learning
  • ensuring that assessments and learning are ‘authentic’, and more closely aligned to the workplace and real-world tasks
  • using a principles-based approach to change which places the importance of developing self-aware, independent learners (which some argue is the main purpose of education at the heart of institutional strategy, policy and practice
  • Supporting tutors through better management tools to help their students. By using technology as a tool for learner management, teachers can develop and execute individual learning plans and track the progress being made by the learner in relation to the employability skills.
  • empowering students as agents of change, which evidence shows benefits all stakeholders including students in the development of wider employability skills. Students and learners can also document their employability skills and self-assessment notes as evidence of their competency and knowledge levels.

We know however that although there is a lot of excellent practice, it is not widespread. Technology can support all of the aims above, but further work is needed to ensure that good practice is shared and teams dedicated to developing learners are supported in maximising opportunities offered by technology, and in exploring how existing employability opportunities can harness technology to best effect.

Slide9

According to research conducted by Cleary, Flynn and Thomasson (2006), it is recommended that for effective employability skills development; the design of an overall active teaching and learning and assessment strategy adheres to the following four adult learning principles:

  1. Responsible learning – learners take responsibility for their learning. Responsible learning emphasises self-management and initiative and enterprise as learners work independently to develop new knowledge and activities in the interest of furthering their skills.”
  2. Experiential learning – learners learn from experience. This “emphasises ‘learning to do’ and ‘learning from doing’. Authentic learning occurs when learners have an opportunity to apply their skills and knowledge in authentic work environments or in contexts which attempt to simulate the real.
  3. Cooperative learning – learners learn with and through others. This form of learning “encourages learners to learn from each other, share learning tasks and learn from a range of people including colleagues, mentors, coaches, supervisors, trainers, and others.
  1. Reflective learning – learners reflect on and learn from their experience. This can be introspective, where learners are encouraged to examine changes in their own perceptions, goals, confidences and motivations. It addresses: developing critical thinking skills, learning to learn and developing attitudes that promote lifelong learning. Reflective learning can be useful in directly addressing problem solving, initiative and enterprise and self-management skills

Digital or e-learning can foster these four types of learning and the development of all of the employability skills.

Slide10

Universities and colleges have a responsibility to develop students into individuals who can thrive in an era of digital information and communication – those who are digitally literate are more likely to be economically secure and these skills are especially important in higher education given that graduate white collar jobs are almost entirely performed on computers and portable devices.

But it’s not just about employability – increasingly digital literacy is vital for learning itself. Digital tools such as virtual learning environments, e-portfolios and social networking software for peer mentoring are now common within further and higher education and students without the skills to navigate them risk suffering an inferior student experience at best, and being left completely behind at worst. It goes beyond IT skills, a complete culture change is required to live fully within the modern digital society, from understanding how to communicate ideas effectively in a range of media to managing digital reputation and history.

Slide19

There are a number of success factors that will be critical as organisations consider an effective use of digital learning to support employability of their students.

They include the following and it is worth bearing in mind that this is an iterative and progressive process which will in turn drive better outcomes.

CONCEPT AND ROLE

  1. Develop the employability skills based on a strategic and structured approach that links the employability skills to each other
  2. Recognise the value of the employability skills in all aspects of life in addition to their employability role, and include recognition of prior developments in these skills in learning and assessment strategies.

PEDAGOGICIAL ASPECTS

  1. Use e-learning in blended learning strategies to cater for a range of learning styles and encourage individualised, self-directed learning.
  2. Adopt active learning strategies such as role plays, real work and simulated work environments, and incorporate e-learning.
  3. Recognise the centrality of learning skills as the foundation for addressing all of the other employability skills.
  4. Break the learning skills into four types: responsible; experiential; cooperative; and reflective learning.
  5. Implement an upfront induction/orientation program to develop awareness and understanding of the employability skills and the e-learning role using a conceptual structure that shows the linkages between these skills.
  6. Link remedial education for basic skills, such as literacy, and development of the employability skills in integrated strategies that harness e-learning.

ASSESSMENT AND REPORTING

  1. Use e-portfolios as a tool for student reflective learning as well as a tool for reporting and assessing learner progress in the employability skills.
  2. Pay attention to the different levels of application and performance of the learners and aid them through the journey,

MANAGEMENT ASPECTS

  1. Use a technology-based learning management system to support individual learning plans, tracking of learner progress and achievement, and the efficient use of teaching resources.
  2. Adopt whole of institution strategies, effectively coordinated and supported by staff development activities in both employability skills and e-learning and particularly e-learning facilitation skills to enhance cooperative learning opportunities.

KEY AREAS FOR FURTHER DEVELOPMENT

  1. Recognise that further innovations and improvements will be required to further strengthen the education framework and support learners and students.

Slide20

There are some efforts we can do to help bridge the employability gap.

We need to make a better case for using technology to develop employability. We need to raise digital aspirations of employers, universities, learning partners and professional bodies such as ACCA and develop students as ‘digital entrepreneurs’ that can go on to act as agents of change for business. Digital literacy often isn’t related to employability skills, and we need to see this change to make a clear link.

We need to work in partnership with employers to understand needs better

We must not forget about those youth that are outside the formal education system, or are otherwise marginalized due to disabilities or their gender. Many youth are employed in the informal sector, and may not be able to access traditional schooling or have access to schools in their regiosn. Offering alternative, non-formal models of relevant education are crucial.

Without these strategies, there is a risk that students leave university or college equipped with the right qualifications for their chosen career but without the tools and understanding they need to thrive in the connected, globalised digital world of today.

Slide21

Overall, I would like to conclude that digital learning and the employability skills should be seen as two of the dynamic influences whose interaction is likely to have a significant impact on shaping the evolving approach to l education and training now and into the future. There is much work to be done but finding effective solutions in this closely interlinked areas of technology, education and employability will help resolve some of the major economic and social issues of our time.